Technical Advisory Committee

Richard Luecht, Ph.D.

Advisory Committee
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Richard M. Luecht, PhD, is a Professor of Educational Research Methodology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro where he teaches graduate courses in applied statistics, graphics design, computer-based testing, and advanced measurement topics such as item response theory and test equating.   He earned his Ph.D. in Urban Education/Research and Measurement from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His research interests include assessment engineering, formative assessments in education, automatic item generation, advanced psychometric modeling of response and timing data, statistical estimation methods, standard setting, informational graphics design, automated test assembly using mathematical optimization models, adaptive multistage testing, and large-scale systems design, integration and implementation for computer-based testing.   

 

Dr. Luecht has published numerous journal articles and book chapters on technical measurement issues and is a technical consultant and advisor for many state department of education testing agencies and large-scale testing organizations. He is an active member of the National Council of Measurement in Education, the American Educational Research Association, and the Association of Test Publishers, and is a past recipient of the Samuel J. Messick Memorial Lecture Award from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the International Language Testing Association.  Professor Luecht is also an active reviewer for many professional statistics and psychometric/measurement journals, and is an associate editor for Applied Psychological Measurement. Before joining UNCG, he was the director for computerized adaptive testing research and senior psychometrician at the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) where among other responsibilities he was instrumental in the design of systems and technologies for the migration of the United States Medical Licensing Examination programs to computerized delivery.  Before joining the NBME, he worked as research measurement scientist at ACT, Incorporated.